No man is complete without his toys. As you probably know, I’m a gadget freak. I’m a firm believer in how technology can make your life better. Unfortunately, technology also gets old and worn out. Case in point: I don’t understand people who use cell phones from 1994. Mine get all beat up very quickly, so I seem to get a new cell phone every year. I’m unintentionally on the cutting edge. Yeah, baby!

No, I don’t have to get the “latest and greatest.” The latest stuff usually commands a premium price, and there are often features that improve with every successive model. Don’t get me wrong; if money was no object, then I’d be buying stuff left and right. Who wouldn’t? A man can dream, can’t he?

PanasonicTC-P54G25 54″ Plasma TV

After nearly 11 years with my first tv, a Sony 32″ Wega, my wife and took the plunge and bought our first HDTV. After much debating and researching, I ultimately went with my first choice, a Panasonic plasma, based on black levels, color accuracy, and overall performance for the price. This television also features Panasonic’s VieraCast that supports Amazon VOD and features YouTube, weather, and news applets, but I don’t use it for any of that. After 5 years, it’s getting a little long in the tooth — the picture isn’t as bright as it used to be. I would like to replace it one day with a large 65″ set. Now that would be something.

Our Panasonic 54″ TC-P54G25 on display

Our Panasonic 54″ TC-P54G25 on display

VIZIO E550i-B2 55″ LED LCD TV

In the still-new-to-us house, we needed a 2nd tv for the family room, so we could watch TV in the Family Room, and the kids could play and watch games in the basement. For only $650, it’s a pretty decent TV. It’s an LED LCD television with built-in WiFi, apps, etc. The backward-firing audio ain’t so hot, so we really need to get an AV receiver and home theater speakers up in here.

Moved the previous TV stand back upstairs to the family room

Moved the previous TV stand back upstairs to the family room

Pioneer VSX-1020-K AV Receiver

I  purchased the VSX-1020-K a few years back, a mid-to-higher-end audio/video receiver. Connected through HDMI, all of my devices (TiVo, TV, PS3) all pipe directly through the Pioneer for audio, and we use the receiver to switch inputs to watch TV or movies.

  • Connections for HD video, HD audio, wireless and analog components.
  • Up to 7.1 channel configuration plus two zones.
  • 1080p video conversion and upscaling, support for 3D video and more
  • iPhone / iPod port and ability to play music straight to the receiver.

The receiver performs very well, and I would say there is a marked improvement over my previous Onkyo receiver. There is also an ethernet jack and an option for a Bluetooth adapter to input streaming audio (NetRadio) directly to the speaker, but I don’t use this feature. I’m happy with the iPhone/iPod port on the front. I upgraded my surround sound in 2011 to a full 7.1 setup, so now I’m fully loaded.

Pioneer VSX-1020K

Pioneer VSX-1020K

 Sony PlayStation 3

My first console system since the 8-bit NES in the late 1980’s, so I’ve come a long way. Cell processor, wireless controllers, 802.11b/g wireless networking, Blu-ray, DVD upconversion, and the ability to watch streaming movies and other content, using the native Netflix & Vudu apps. It’s also beautiful to behold. We use the PlayStation primarily for watching movies through Netflix, but I play games when I have the time. A huge benefit is that, since we only own a handful of Blu-ray discs, it does an excellent job at upscaling DVD 480p video. I’m planning to pick up the PlayStation 4 sometime this year.

Sony PlayStation 3

Logitech Harmony One and PS3 Adapter

With all the home theater equipment in our houses, the number of remote controls increase as well. With our new Panasonic plasma, the new Pioneer AV receiver, the Tivo DVR, and the PS3, to watch a movie or show requires 2-3 remotes at any time. Nonsense, I say. It took a few months, but we upgraded to a Logitech Harmony One universal remote control to control all of our devices. To control the PS3, we also needed the Logitech Harmony PS3 Adapter. The device is configured using a web-based configuration screen, then the config downloaded via USB cable.

Logitech Harmony One

Logitech Harmony One

Harmony One in the cradle and the PS3 adapter

Harmony One in the cradle and the PS3 adapter

Tivo Roamio Plus and Premiere Series 4 DVR

After owning two Series 2 DVRs, and then learning to despise the Verizon FiOS STB/DVR over the course of 15 months, we upgraded to the Tivo Premiere Series 4 DVR. The Tivo Series 4 has double the storage capacity, is more internet-friendly, and a somewhat better user interface. It’s currently on our network via the Tivo 802.11n wireless adapter. While I like the Series 4 in theory, Tivo had not worked out all the kinks yet. There are a number of UI screens not yet converted to HD, and the interface overall was originally sluggish (one of the processor cores was disabled due to “stability reasons.”) Since then, the folks at TiVo put out additional system firmware updates. The 2nd processor core has been enabled, the OS is more responsive, and I haven’t seen the green spinning wheel of death in a long while. No more updates are likely, as they’re putting all their energies into newer Tivos.

We are the proud owners of a Tivo Roamio Plus DVR. It’s the next generation of Tivo, with much better internal components, and a faster UI. It comes with 6 different tuners, built-in 802.11 a/b/g/n, faster processor, etc. With two Tivo DVRs on the home network, we can now stream or transfer most recordings between both units.

 

Samsung Galaxy S7

After accidentally trashing my Galaxy S5 while charging it one day, it was dead. Much unexpected and untimely sadness. was most interested in:

  • 5.1″ screen with 2560 x 1440 pixels
  • 802.11a/ac/b/g/n
  • a quad-core processor
  • 32 GB
  • 12 megapixel camera
  • Full HD Super AMOLED

 

 Google Nexus 7 [2013]

I waited a long time to get an iPad, but couldn’t afford it. I ended up buying the Nexus 7 in 2013.

  • Android 4.3 Jelly Bean
  • 1.5 GHz quad-core Qualcomm Snapdragon S4 Pro
  • Adreno 320 @ 400 MHz
  • 7.02 in (178 mm) diagonal LED-backlit IPS LCD capacitive touchscreen, 1920 x 1200 pixels (323 ppi)
  • 2 GB RAM
  • 32 GB internal storage
  • 3,950 mAh rechargeable Lithium-ion polymer battery
  • front-facing and rear-facing cameras
  • Wi-Fi Dual-band (802.11 b/g/n @ 2.4 GHz & 5 GHz)
  • Bluetooth 4.0
The 2013 Nexus 7

The 2013 Nexus 7

Apple iPad Air 2

In 2016, my wife bought me an an iPad Air 2, after I waited 6 long years for a tablet. I gotta say it’s a premium quality product, and it feels good to use.

ipad-air-witb-gray-wif-201410_GEO_US

Klipsch S4i

I had to replace my Shure SE-210 earphones, but I didn’t want to spend over $100 again to do it. After some research, the Klipsch S4i earphones for about $70 fit the bill. There good reviews on sound performance, good noise isolation and bass, sleek flat cables, and a 3-button mic and remote.

Klipsch S4i

Klipsch S4i

My Intel i7-2600 Desktop PC

After nearly 7 years of slugging it out with my previous 2005-era single-core P4 3.6 GHz Dell Dimension 8400, a friend of mine and I built out the specs for a new custom-built PC. I considered purchasing another PC from Dell or HP, but realized that while the overall desktop PC wouldn’t be too expensive, these manufacturers cut corners with the components within. Ultimately, I’be stuck with a chassis filled with inferior parts.

I was better off purchasing quality parts and building it with my friend’s help. The only thing I didn’t initially like were the louder-than-expected case fans. I recently upgraded it with a quieter Noctua internal fan, and disconnected the original front intake fan. Based on future performance needs, I may decide to add in quieter front intake fan, or upgrade to a super-fast SSD primary hard drive. Here are the specs on the PC:

  • Antec Three Hundred Black Steel ATX Mid Tower case (plenty of expansion room and good airflow)
  • Intel i7-2600 3.4 GHz quad-core processor (8M Cache, up to 3.80 GHz)
  • 16 GB Corsair Vengeance DDR3 RAM (plenty of RAM to work with)
  • Windows 7 Home Premium 64-bit (To take advantage of the extra RAM)
  • Gigabyte GA-Z68X-UD4-B3 LGA 1155 motherboard (USB 3.0, USB ports allowing iPhone/iPod charging even when the PC is off)
  • EVGA GeForce GTX 570 1280 MB graphics card (watching moveies, playing the latest games)
  • Samsung Blu-ray player / DVD-RW drive (I can watch Blu-ray movies in HD quality from my desk)
  • Creative 7.1 Sound Blaster X-Fi Titanium (I couldn’t settle for onboard audio)
  • 256 GB Samsung 840 Pro solid state drive
  • 2 TB Western Digital 7200 RPM HDD (partitioned between OS and data)
My I7-2600 Sandy Bridge-based desktop PC

My I7-2600 Sandy Bridge-based desktop PC

Dell U2412M 24″ LCD HD Monitors

Why limit yourself to one monitor when you can have two? For a long time, I didn’t see the value, but now I’ve come around. Multitasking sounded great — in my mind, I could imagine putting an MSNBC news video on one screen, and working on the other screen. That concept appealed to me greatly. My wife got them for my birthday, and I am thrilled. Each monitor provides a lot of screen real estate to work on, and I do love to maximize Netflix and other videos to take up the full screen, and to continue working on the other monitor.

Dual 24" Dell U2412M HD LCD monitors

Dual 24″ Dell U2412M HD LCD monitors

Logitech Illuminated Wireless Keyboard K800

I had the Logitech Cordless MX Duo for nigh on 10 years. It was a good run. Cordless keyboard & mouse combo, comfortable, RF, dedicated multimedia keys, rechargeable, and long-lasting. The mouse cradle stopped charging after 8 years, and we had to constantly swap out the batteries and recharge them. Finally, after upgrading the previous PC to Windows 7 (64-bit) didn’t support the keyboard multimedia functions. All good things must come to an end.

I went for the new Logitech K800, after much researching. I like the wireless option, the dedicated multimedia keys, and best of all — the illuminated keys. It looks stylish and fun to have yours hands on in the dark. If you look at it that way, it’s really a reflection of me. Presently, I find the keyboard extremely comfortable to use. Also, the Unifying receiver saves me one USB port by sharing it with the Performance Mouse MX I’m also using.

Logitech Wireless Illuminated Keyboard K800

Logitech Wireless Illuminated Keyboard K800

Logitech K750 Wireless Solar Keyboard

While I love my K800 keyboard with back-lighting, it wouldn’t be the best bang for the buck in the office. I picked up the Logitech K750 to use at work every day. It’s solar powered, but ambient light from light bulbs will also charge the battery.

Logitech K750 Wireless Solar Keyboard

Logitech K750 Wireless Solar Keyboard

Logitech Performance Mouse MX

See above about the issues with the previous Logitech Cordless Duo MX. As to be expected, it’s a mouse with a whole mess o’ buttons. What drew me to this particular $80 mouse was:

  • the Unifying receiver so that one receiver on a single USB port supports up to six peripherals. Here’s it’s my keyboard and mouse.
  • it’s comfortable to hold.
  • when I want to charge it, both the mouse and the K800 keyboard can share the same micro-USB charging cable to recharge. Furthermore, I can use the mouse and charge it simultaneously. Basically works like corded mouse at that point.

I liked it enough that I purchased an 2nd one for use at the office every day.

Logitech Performance Mouse MX

Logitech Performance Mouse MX

Logitech C920 Webcam

For seven years, we used the Logitech 4000 webcam, though it was a little herky-jerky due to the slow PC being maxed out on system resources when we Skyped. After we upgraded to Windows 7 64-bit, it began to work very erratically, so overall, fairly useless. My wife wasn’t totally sold on it, but I wanted a new webcam so that we could video chat with family and friends. Unfortunately, our friends and family aren’t quite sold on video chatting either.

It’s the 21st century, people. We should be video chatting. I’ll convert everyone yet. I swear it. Here are the specs that attracted me to this webcam:

  • Full HD 1080p video calling and recording
  • 15 MP pictures through photo capture
  • Carl Zeiss lens with 20-step autofocus
  • Stereo audio with dual mics

    Logitech C920 HD webcam

    Logitech C920 HD webcam

Logitech Z-5300

280 watts, THX-rated. These are nice computer speakers. I’ve learned that there is no real discrete surround sound in PC gaming, but these are a nice-to-have anyway.

Logitech Z5300

Western Digital My Cloud (4 TB) External Storage

Although I have two hard drives in our main desktop PC, we quickly ran out of room with our growing video library. In 2014, we purchased a Western Digital My Cloud network attached storage device. We’re not using it for all of our documents, pictures, or music collection yet. For now, it’s just for the video library serving up files to our Plex Media Server. We purchased the 4 TB model, which is nearly out of capacity. It has a Gigabit Ethernet port, and a USB 3.0 port for hooking up additional external drives.

Western Digital My Cloud (4 TB)

Western Digital My Cloud (4 TB)

Seagate Backup Plus Desktop Drive

We used to back up all of our data to a WD Elements external drive, but the specs were lacking by the time 2014 rolled around. USB 2.0? Only 2 TB capacity? I replaced it with one of Seagate’s Backup Plus external drives. It has USB 3.0 and 5 TB of capacity. It’s good and fast, but I don’t know why the power adapter whines when the PC is off. Still a good purchase.

Seagate Backup Plus Desktop Drive (5 TB)

Seagate Backup Plus Desktop Drive (5 TB)

HP LaserJet 1300n

Sick of inkjets that wear out in 3 months, we opted for a laser printer. Faster, stronger, better, and not as expensive as they used to be. We opted for the 1300n model, which came with a network card. Why? Because, being networked to the home LAN means anyone can plug into the network and independently print from anywhere in the house. She loves it. None of this Microsoft Windows Printer Sharing crap.

  • Up to 1,200 x 1,200 dpi resolution
  • Up to 20 ppm print speed
  • 16 MB standard memory, expandable to 80 MB
  • First page in just 8 seconds
  • USB and parallel interfaces, optional networking

    HP Laserjet 1300n

Nikon D5200

After many years of various point-and-shoot cameras — a high quality P&S camera, a cheapo one, my father’s Yashica SLR, and smartphones, this is my first dSLR. It’s more complicated than a point-and-shoot, sure, but I’ve been pretty amazed and jealous of all those high quality photos taken by friends and family. I don’t want to simply have an expensive P&S camera, using autofocus in every shot. I want to truly learn photography, and branch out. The D5200 is a midrange camera suited for beginners like myself, with a balance of ease of use vs enough features that I can explore manual settings. Key features/specifications are:

  • 24.1MP DX format CMOS sensor
  • EXPEED 3 processing
  • ISO 100-6400 standard, up to 25600 expanded
  • 5 fps continuous shooting
  • 39 point AF system, 9 sensors cross type
  • 2016 pixel RGB metering sensor
  • 1080p30 video recording, built-in stereo mic
  • 921k dot 3″ vari-angle LCD monitor, 170° viewing angle
Nikon D5200

Nikon D5200

To go along with the D5200 camera body, I have three lenses at my disposal. I have one 18-55 mm lens for every day use, a 50 mm “prime” lens with a fixed focal length and a fast aperture, and a 55-200 mm  telephoto lens.

2016 Bianchi Intenso 105

After 14 years riding my old aluminum road bike, I decided to upgrade my ride. I’m currently riding a Bianchi Intenso 105. It features a carbon frame and fork, and Shimano’s 105 groupset.
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