Bert, left, and Ernie have been mainstays of "Sesame Street" since the beginning.

Bert, left, and Ernie have been mainstays of "Sesame Street" since the beginning.

I’m trying to get my son into more of Sesame Street, instead of all that Nickelodeon cartoons. Don’t get me wrong, I used to watch Nickelodeon when I was young, but for his max 1 hour of television watching per day, I’d prefer it if he was watching healthy, educational TV.  Like many of us growing up in the 1970’s and 1980’s, I watched Sesame Street while growing up.  I do remember Mr. Hooper (before and after his death), if that helps to date me.

I’d have introduce him to Mr. Rogers Neighborhood, but the show no longer airs.

Author Michael Davis has a new book named “Street Gang”, which goes over the background and history of the show.  It covers Jim Henson, who was abviously involved with the show from the very beginning. Davis has a website for the book too — http://www.streetgangbook.com

Sesame Street (and PBS) taught me a lot, and I appreciate it.  I want my kids to benefit too.  You know who else taught me a lot?  Steve Austin, the $6 million dollar man.  He taught me to never go up against a Sasquatch without backup.

muppetsSpeaking about the Muppets, CNN /Mental Floss had a article providing a brief-but-interesting background history on 20 of the popular Muppets that Jim Henson created.