I gotta say this.  Life is interesting.  So much happens that is good, great, embarassing, mortifying, aggravating, surprising, frustrating, stressful, enjoyable, saddening.  You never know what’s coming around the corner, but in the end, it makes life interesting.  If none of it happened, wouldn’t every day be boring?  I suppose it is all how you look at it.

Sometimes I wonder why office life (anywhere, no particular organization) needs to be so tumultuous.  New people coming in, friends going out.  People being forced out, new processes being established.  You could sit there and wonder, “Why can’t this place just stay the same?”  In my short career so far, I’ve seen/heard people targeting others, pushing them out.  New procedures, policies, methods in place, making people uncomfortable.  However, I realized organizations need change.  Without change, an organization becomes stagnant.  The outside world is always changing, and if you want to stay relevant, you have to adapt to change.  Maybe it’s okay that organizations change over time, making people uncomfortable.  It shakes things up, keeps you on your toes.  Challenges you.  Stirs up the water.

We’ve been doing this for millions of years. In the jungle, or on the plains. Now the jungle is filled with cubicles.  Evolve or die.  Food for thought.

My wife and I started working on our wills this week, courtesy of Quicken WillMaker 2009. We’ve both discussed for a long while now, but never committed.  Recently, we learned that in NJ, without a will, the courts are allowed to decide what to do with our children, in the worst case scenario that both of us died. Nums downloaded the software and installed it, and started populating each of our wills.  The software is helpful in asking the questions, but it doesn’t help you with finding the right answers.

  • Who gets Josh and Lily if we’re not around?  Who can raise them?  What if the guardians can’t handle their kids AND our kids at some point in time?
  • How do we allocate the funds for braces and other expenses before they turn 18, fund their collegiate expenses, and how much to give them after the turn 23, or 25, or 28?
  • Setting up trust funds?
  • Who should execute our wills?
  • Who gets what possessions?  Give them away to family, donate to charity, sell and give the cash to the children?

Lots of uncomfortable questions.  Just the idea that someone else would raise your kids can really bother you.  It’s hard sometimes for yourself to know what to do with your monkeys, but they’re YOUR monkeys, and you trust yourself to figure it out in their best interests.  How do you know the guardians will do the right thing?

So the old stove is finally gone.  Lowes contractors came 6 hours late, and carted it.  Yeah, 6 hours late.

Less than 24 hours later, the swivel clip for my cellphone holster broke.  Broke.  Worst $8 I have ever spent.  I don’t know if it’s the absolute worst $8 I ever spent, but it’s definitely up high on the rankings.  What to do now?  No idea.  I wrote the online vendor about a defective merchandise exchange, so find out what happens next.

Life may be interesting, but I don’t know if I would categorize the aggravating portions as anything else besides aggravating.